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Tim Wohlford
02-Jul-2007, 05:26 PM
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/06/070628162055.htm

Not only do you get new brain cells, you get happy brain cells!

Tim Wohlford

Jim Henderson
02-Jul-2007, 05:36 PM
On Mon, 02 Jul 2007 16:26:32 +0000, Tim Wohlford wrote:

> http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/06/070628162055.htm
>
> Not only do you get new brain cells, you get happy brain cells!

I'd heard about this a couple years ago - it's supposed to be a way of
helping Alzheimer's patients as well. Those who are more active tend to
suffer less from the disease; while not a cure, it is something that can
help.

My dad was diagnosed with Alzheimer's about 10 years ago, and after that
he had a heart attack, so he ended up exercising more as the therapy
after his bypass operation. That seemed to help quite a bit. Maybe
wishful thinking, maybe not...

Jim

Tim Wohlford
02-Jul-2007, 07:00 PM
We all know that there is a connection between body, mind and soul (psyche).
Sometimes we just need medical science to rediscover that fact.

Everytime I go to the doctor's office I'm struck w/ the number of miserable
people who are sick as a result of their psychological unhappiness.
Sometimes, after overhearing them talk about their various life problems, I
want to tell them that they're at the wrong doctor -- that this doctor can
treat symptoms, but a good therapist down the street can treat the root of
their suffering.

When I exercise, I get good sleep. When I exercise, I burn off all that
anger and anxiety that otherwise would go to depression. When I have sore
muscles, my mind works better (love endorphines!).

Tim





"Jim Henderson" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:WP9ii.1830$8i6.1335@prv-forum2.provo.novell.com...
> On Mon, 02 Jul 2007 16:26:32 +0000, Tim Wohlford wrote:
>
>> http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/06/070628162055.htm
>>
>> Not only do you get new brain cells, you get happy brain cells!
>
> I'd heard about this a couple years ago - it's supposed to be a way of
> helping Alzheimer's patients as well. Those who are more active tend to
> suffer less from the disease; while not a cure, it is something that can
> help.
>
> My dad was diagnosed with Alzheimer's about 10 years ago, and after that
> he had a heart attack, so he ended up exercising more as the therapy
> after his bypass operation. That seemed to help quite a bit. Maybe
> wishful thinking, maybe not...
>
> Jim

Elrey
02-Jul-2007, 08:44 PM
I can attest that exercise and running have helped me through some
depressing times. I thought brain cells were a one time thing though? That
once they formed you don't acquire any more. Maybe that's just a wives tale
to keep us from drinking and smoking as kids?


"Tim Wohlford" <geek49203@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:YG9ii.1827$8i6.640@prv-forum2.provo.novell.com...
> http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/06/070628162055.htm
>
> Not only do you get new brain cells, you get happy brain cells!
>
> Tim Wohlford
>

Jim Henderson
02-Jul-2007, 10:09 PM
On Mon, 02 Jul 2007 18:00:12 +0000, Tim Wohlford wrote:

> We all know that there is a connection between body, mind and soul
> (psyche). Sometimes we just need medical science to rediscover that
> fact.

Yep, the other thing that we need medical science to do is rediscover
root cause analysis. I've got an appointment with an allergist in a
couple of weeks - every time I would mention it to my primary care
physician, he'd just throw more samples of different drugs at the problem
rather than give me a referral to a specialist.

Now I don't need to ask his permission. ;-)

> Everytime I go to the doctor's office I'm struck w/ the number of
> miserable people who are sick as a result of their psychological
> unhappiness. Sometimes, after overhearing them talk about their various
> life problems, I want to tell them that they're at the wrong doctor --
> that this doctor can treat symptoms, but a good therapist down the
> street can treat the root of their suffering.

Exactly.

> When I exercise, I get good sleep. When I exercise, I burn off all that
> anger and anxiety that otherwise would go to depression. When I have
> sore muscles, my mind works better (love endorphines!).

I've found that as well - I worked with a trainer for a few months last
October-December, and this week I'm starting again, but instead of
meeting twice a week, I'm meeting every other week; I am motivated enough
to do the workouts, but I need someone to help with the nutrition plan
(which they do) as well as to just provide a constant checkpoint on my
progress.

Doing a meet every other week also gives me guidance through the end of
August at a fairly low cost, which is nice.

Jim

Lance Reynolds
02-Jul-2007, 10:22 PM
Jim,

If you have allergies, I highly recommend getting tested and getting the
shots. I've been doing them for a couple of years now and I don't have
near as much trouble with my sinuses as I used to.


Lance

Jim Henderson
02-Jul-2007, 10:28 PM
On Mon, 02 Jul 2007 21:22:57 +0000, Lance Reynolds wrote:

> Jim,
>
> If you have allergies, I highly recommend getting tested and getting the
> shots. I've been doing them for a couple of years now and I don't have
> near as much trouble with my sinuses as I used to.

We're going to be doing the tests - I hate shots, but I've reached the
point where I hate the sinus problems more. :-)

Jim

Beth Cole
02-Jul-2007, 10:43 PM
Jim Henderson wrote:
> We're going to be doing the tests - I hate shots, but I've reached the
> point where I hate the sinus problems more. :-)

*nodnodnod*

Last week, I broke down and went to the allergist, after having a
full-on anaphylactic[1] reaction to a food allergy a couple weeks
earlier (there is this whole problem of him having time on his schedule....)

It looks like I'm going to need weekly shots for a year to pull my
immune system out of hyper-reactivity due to moderate to severe
allergies to dust mites and wheat mold. Once we do that, there is a
better chance of not having quite as severe a reaction if I do run into
that particular food problem again.


[1] There is very little quite so frightening as looking at yourself in
the mirror to see lips that are medium blue, a tongue that is dark blue,
and a face that is gray/white, all due to lack of oxygen. Worse is when
you're in a hotel room in a strange city. What is really bad is that,
at the time, I didn't recognize what I was seeing. It wasn't until the
next morning that I thought through it and realized that I'd nearly died.

--
Don't go around saying the world owes you a living. The world owes you
nothing. It was here first. ~Mark Twain

Lance Reynolds
02-Jul-2007, 10:43 PM
Jim Henderson wrote:
> We're going to be doing the tests - I hate shots, but I've reached the
> point where I hate the sinus problems more. :-)
>
> Jim

Good for you. The shots aren't bad at all. They only stick the needle
in just under the skin. It's not like a flu shot or the like.

Lance

Lance Reynolds
02-Jul-2007, 10:47 PM
Beth Cole wrote:
> It looks like I'm going to need weekly shots for a year to pull my
> immune system out...

That's what I did. After a year, I went into maintenance phase and go
every two weeks. Got retested after a year and a half and there was
dramatic improvement.

Tim Wohlford
03-Jul-2007, 04:08 AM
> every time I would mention it to my primary care
> physician, he'd just throw more samples of different drugs at the problem
> rather than give me a referral to a specialist.
>

Yeah, well, most patients believe that unless the doc gives them some
expensive drugs (hopefully the ones they've seen in the new TV ads!) that
the doctor hasn't "done anything." I mean, far be if for the doc to
suggest that we exercise, eat right, and get our life in order.

Sadly, no medical testing in the world can anticipate the witch's brew that
we end up taking. I mean, if I take Drugs A, B, C, and D, does anyone
really know what the sum of the parts will be, especially when B and D are
brand new?

I suffered from chest pains about 3 years ago. My cardiologist said I was
fine, but no one could cure the chest pains. Finally, I met a sports
medicine doc who said that he's seen my condition many times, and was sure
that he could fix it. However, my doc wouldn't refer me (imporant in an
HMO) until I mentioned that my shoulder was making grinding noises.

The sports med doc put my ribs back into place, prescribed exercises, and in
the process, fixed the chest pains AND the shoulder pain. All of it was
low-tech, no meds, no expensive machines -- in fact, the guy who did the
work was the doctor's assistant, a guy who'd previously been employed by the
Detoit Lions (who know a lot about getting beat up).

My primary doc still doesn't believe that my chest pains were cured by the
sports med doc.


Tim

Jim Henderson
03-Jul-2007, 05:21 AM
On Tue, 03 Jul 2007 03:08:22 +0000, Tim Wohlford wrote:

>> every time I would mention it to my primary care physician, he'd just
>> throw more samples of different drugs at the problem rather than give
>> me a referral to a specialist.
>>
>>
> Yeah, well, most patients believe that unless the doc gives them some
> expensive drugs (hopefully the ones they've seen in the new TV ads!)
> that the doctor hasn't "done anything." I mean, far be if for the doc
> to suggest that we exercise, eat right, and get our life in order.

I think we need a moratorium on this drug advertising that goes on - it
turns everyone into an "overnight expert" on their symptoms. *I*
shouldn't have to ask my doctor if Flaxicoricumin is right for me - the
doctor should *diagnose* me and determine a course of treatment - and not
a course of treatment based on some weekend retreat he got from a drug
company! (This makes me SO angry these days!)

> Sadly, no medical testing in the world can anticipate the witch's brew
> that we end up taking. I mean, if I take Drugs A, B, C, and D, does
> anyone really know what the sum of the parts will be, especially when B
> and D are brand new?

True, but some diagnostic work would be a good thing. The drug companies
are pushing a "Windows crashed" solution on us - just reboot and
everything will be fine until the next time you need something. It's
stupid, and a great waste fo money.

> I suffered from chest pains about 3 years ago. My cardiologist said I
> was fine, but no one could cure the chest pains. Finally, I met a
> sports medicine doc who said that he's seen my condition many times, and
> was sure that he could fix it. However, my doc wouldn't refer me
> (imporant in an HMO) until I mentioned that my shoulder was making
> grinding noises.
>
> The sports med doc put my ribs back into place, prescribed exercises,
> and in the process, fixed the chest pains AND the shoulder pain. All of
> it was low-tech, no meds, no expensive machines -- in fact, the guy who
> did the work was the doctor's assistant, a guy who'd previously been
> employed by the Detoit Lions (who know a lot about getting beat up).
>
> My primary doc still doesn't believe that my chest pains were cured by
> the sports med doc.

Methinks your primary doc could do with some lessons in not displaying
such hubris as to think he knows everything....

Jim

Jim Henderson
03-Jul-2007, 05:22 AM
On Mon, 02 Jul 2007 21:43:18 +0000, Beth Cole wrote:

> [1] There is very little quite so frightening as looking at yourself in
> the mirror to see lips that are medium blue, a tongue that is dark blue,
> and a face that is gray/white, all due to lack of oxygen. Worse is when
> you're in a hotel room in a strange city. What is really bad is that,
> at the time, I didn't recognize what I was seeing. It wasn't until the
> next morning that I thought through it and realized that I'd nearly
> died.

Ouch. I can think of one thing worse, and that's seeing your kid do that
(which we did - Ken is asthmatic and was undiagnosed until he was ashen
grey with blue lips). In either case, not a pretty thing to have to go
through.

Jim

Jim Henderson
03-Jul-2007, 05:24 AM
On Mon, 02 Jul 2007 21:43:38 +0000, Lance Reynolds wrote:

> Jim Henderson wrote:
>> We're going to be doing the tests - I hate shots, but I've reached the
>> point where I hate the sinus problems more. :-)
>>
>> Jim
>
> Good for you. The shots aren't bad at all. They only stick the needle
> in just under the skin. It's not like a flu shot or the like.

That doesn't sound so bad. I've a bad feeling it's cat dander, and we're
not getting rid of the cats (though some days it feels like we should,
not so much from the allergies, but rather annoyance. Fortunately,
that's not enough to actually cause us to get rid of the fur lumps...)

Jim

Lance Reynolds
03-Jul-2007, 02:43 PM
Jim Henderson wrote:

> That doesn't sound so bad. I've a bad feeling it's cat dander, and we're
> not getting rid of the cats (though some days it feels like we should,
> not so much from the allergies, but rather annoyance. Fortunately,
> that's not enough to actually cause us to get rid of the fur lumps...)
>
> Jim

It turned out I'm allergic to cats and dogs(along with just about every
tree and grass you can think of), something I had no idea about. I have
both but the cat is the only one that comes in every now and then.
They'll probably tell you to get rid of everything in your house except
the kitchen sink, but some of what they say is just simply
impracticable.

Lance

Jim Henderson
03-Jul-2007, 08:51 PM
On Tue, 03 Jul 2007 13:43:02 +0000, Lance Reynolds wrote:

> It turned out I'm allergic to cats and dogs(along with just about every
> tree and grass you can think of), something I had no idea about. I have
> both but the cat is the only one that comes in every now and then.
> They'll probably tell you to get rid of everything in your house except
> the kitchen sink, but some of what they say is just simply
> impracticable.

Yeah, and that's one reason why I've not wanted to get tested...

Jim

Lance Reynolds
03-Jul-2007, 09:11 PM
Jim Henderson wrote:
> Yeah, and that's one reason why I've not wanted to get tested...
>
> Jim

I just nod my head and said OK. There are advantages though...it got me
out of mowing the yard for a couple of years. Doc said not to! :-)

brain
03-Jul-2007, 09:30 PM
What's worse, doctor's shouldn't prescribe drugs. That's a pharmicist's
job. Physicians are trained to diagnose.

That's why the drug companies are trying to cut the pharmacist out of
the picture. They don't make any money if a pharm. tells a patient to
eat a banana, drink tea etc.


--
brain, not brain



> I think we need a moratorium on this drug advertising that goes on -
> it turns everyone into an "overnight expert" on their symptoms. I
> shouldn't have to ask my doctor if Flaxicoricumin is right for me -
> the doctor should diagnose me and determine a course of treatment -
> and not a course of treatment based on some weekend retreat he got
> from a drug company! (This makes me SO angry these days!)
>

brain
03-Jul-2007, 09:32 PM
I think it is true but then again we only use about 20% so I think
there are plenty there to substitute the bad ones.

--
brain, not brain


Elrey scrivi:

> I can attest that exercise and running have helped me through some
> depressing times. I thought brain cells were a one time thing
> though? That once they formed you don't acquire any more. Maybe
> that's just a wives tale to keep us from drinking and smoking as kids?
>
>
> "Tim Wohlford" <geek49203@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:YG9ii.1827$8i6.640@prv-forum2.provo.novell.com...
> > http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/06/070628162055.htm
> >
> > Not only do you get new brain cells, you get happy brain cells!
> >
> > Tim Wohlford
> >

Jim Henderson
03-Jul-2007, 11:35 PM
On Tue, 03 Jul 2007 20:11:38 +0000, Lance Reynolds wrote:

> I just nod my head and said OK. There are advantages though...it got me
> out of mowing the yard for a couple of years. Doc said not to! :-)

We used to pay someone to do that, but then he moved and we haven't found
a replacement yet. Good news: We have a 19-year-old kid. Bad news:
He's allergic to grass as well as being asthmatic.

Jim

Jim Henderson
03-Jul-2007, 11:36 PM
On Tue, 03 Jul 2007 20:30:40 +0000, brain wrote:

> What's worse, doctor's shouldn't prescribe drugs. That's a pharmicist's
> job. Physicians are trained to diagnose.
>
> That's why the drug companies are trying to cut the pharmacist out of
> the picture. They don't make any money if a pharm. tells a patient to
> eat a banana, drink tea etc.

Hadn't thought about that, but I think the idea that physicians are
trained to diagnose is incorrect - they're trained to diagnose and
treat. I wouldn't want a pharmacist to have done the surgery on my
broken leg... ;-)

Jim

Uwe Buckesfeld
04-Jul-2007, 05:35 AM
Jim Henderson wrote:

> Yeah, and that's one reason why I've not wanted to get tested...

Same here.

U

Sewermonger
04-Jul-2007, 10:28 AM
I was tested and found out that I was allergic to air pollution (already
knew that)

The only thing that has helped has been hot peppers, spicy foods etc.
Oh... and sinus irrigation with salt water.


--
Sewermonger

<-----\|||/------>
>----(@@)-----<
ooO_(_)_Ooo________________________________
_____|_____|_____|_____|_____|_____|_____|_____|
___|____|_____|_____|_____|_____|_____|_____|___
_____|_____ Sewermonger _____|_____

brain
04-Jul-2007, 03:17 PM
You're right but any time something is digested or injected, there
should be the pharmicist in middle.

B
--
brain, not brain


Jim Henderson scrivi:

> On Tue, 03 Jul 2007 20:30:40 +0000, brain wrote:
>
> > What's worse, doctor's shouldn't prescribe drugs. That's a
> > pharmicist's job. Physicians are trained to diagnose.
> >
> > That's why the drug companies are trying to cut the pharmacist out
> > of the picture. They don't make any money if a pharm. tells a
> > patient to eat a banana, drink tea etc.
>
> Hadn't thought about that, but I think the idea that physicians are
> trained to diagnose is incorrect - they're trained to diagnose and
> treat. I wouldn't want a pharmacist to have done the surgery on my
> broken leg... ;-)
>
> Jim

Jim Henderson
04-Jul-2007, 08:43 PM
On Wed, 04 Jul 2007 14:17:38 +0000, brain wrote:

> You're right but any time something is digested or injected, there
> should be the pharmicist in middle.

Maybe, maybe not. There again, with the high cost of health care in the
US, I'm not sure that I want a pharmacist to have to be present when the
doctors are, for example, administering morphine. I'd rather the doctor
be trained properly to deal with administering drug treatments, but that
it should be their *professional judgment* and not based on who gave them
the best golf vacation.

Jim