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Jim
02-Jul-2007, 11:27 PM
I reported to Dell that a PC here had "hard drive imminent fail" in the
Windows event log and that the BIOS SMART said a hard drive parameter
is out of spec. The solution? They have arranged a service call to
replace the motherboard. Huh?
--

Wallgames.com
03-Jul-2007, 02:10 AM
That's not impossible, but it wouldn't be my first guess...

-Bob Carroll


"Jim" <hoo.me@some.net> wrote in message
news:xn0f88al14p5s65000@support-forums.novell.com...
>I reported to Dell that a PC here had "hard drive imminent fail" in the
> Windows event log and that the BIOS SMART said a hard drive parameter
> is out of spec. The solution? They have arranged a service call to
> replace the motherboard. Huh?
> --
>

Dave Taylor
03-Jul-2007, 07:49 AM
"Wallgames.com" <BobNOSPAMPLEASE@wallgames.com> wrote in news:rmhii.2019
$8i6.61@prv-forum2.provo.novell.com:

> That's not impossible, but it wouldn't be my first guess...
>
> -Bob Carroll
>
>
> "Jim" <hoo.me@some.net> wrote in message
> news:xn0f88al14p5s65000@support-forums.novell.com...
>>I reported to Dell that a PC here had "hard drive imminent fail" in the
>> Windows event log and that the BIOS SMART said a hard drive parameter
>> is out of spec. The solution? They have arranged a service call to
>> replace the motherboard. Huh?
>> --
>>
>
>
>

So the IDE controller is at fault and not the drive, hmm, how did they
figure that out? Must be some darn good diags suite.

--
Ciao, Dave

Wallgames.com
03-Jul-2007, 11:22 AM
Or perhaps that motherboard has.a history of failures which display that, or
similar, errors.

Controller failures are relatively rare, but it's best to be prepared if
you're making a repair in the field. Personally, I find it simpler to carry
an add-on PCI controller card for testing.

-Bob Carroll


"Dave Taylor" <daveytay@nospamplshotmail.com> wrote in message
news:Xns9962BFB141ED1daveytaynospamplshot@130.57.1 .73...
> "Wallgames.com" <BobNOSPAMPLEASE@wallgames.com> wrote in news:rmhii.2019
> $8i6.61@prv-forum2.provo.novell.com:
>
>> That's not impossible, but it wouldn't be my first guess...
>>
>> -Bob Carroll
>>
>>
>> "Jim" <hoo.me@some.net> wrote in message
>> news:xn0f88al14p5s65000@support-forums.novell.com...
>>>I reported to Dell that a PC here had "hard drive imminent fail" in the
>>> Windows event log and that the BIOS SMART said a hard drive parameter
>>> is out of spec. The solution? They have arranged a service call to
>>> replace the motherboard. Huh?
>>> --
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>
> So the IDE controller is at fault and not the drive, hmm, how did they
> figure that out? Must be some darn good diags suite.
>
> --
> Ciao, Dave

Jay Calderwood
03-Jul-2007, 12:40 PM
Jim wrote:
> I reported to Dell that a PC here had "hard drive imminent fail" in the
> Windows event log and that the BIOS SMART said a hard drive parameter
> is out of spec. The solution? They have arranged a service call to
> replace the motherboard. Huh?

Come again?

--
Jay Calderwood
http://jaycalderwood.blogspot.com

Quote: "I have worked HARD for everything I have. A beautiful family
which includes a beautiful Soon-to-be wife,
a bunch of beautiful healthy kids, 2 annoying pooches, and an occasional
Pooh Bear (silly ol' bear he is).
Like I said I worked hard for what I have and I'm not going to lose this
because this is what I always have wanted.
I need to remove those cancerous people from my life to keep what I
have, and I will. I'm tired of all
the backstabbing and deceit. This is my world, I created it, now it is
time to kill what I let happen. I will not turn back."

Craig
03-Jul-2007, 02:26 PM
Aren't IDE controllers on the drive? :)

"Dave Taylor" <daveytay@nospamplshotmail.com> wrote in message
news:Xns9962BFB141ED1daveytaynospamplshot@130.57.1 .73...
> "Wallgames.com" <BobNOSPAMPLEASE@wallgames.com> wrote in news:rmhii.2019
> $8i6.61@prv-forum2.provo.novell.com:
>
>> That's not impossible, but it wouldn't be my first guess...
>>
>> -Bob Carroll
>>
>>
>> "Jim" <hoo.me@some.net> wrote in message
>> news:xn0f88al14p5s65000@support-forums.novell.com...
>>>I reported to Dell that a PC here had "hard drive imminent fail" in the
>>> Windows event log and that the BIOS SMART said a hard drive parameter
>>> is out of spec. The solution? They have arranged a service call to
>>> replace the motherboard. Huh?
>>> --
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>
> So the IDE controller is at fault and not the drive, hmm, how did they
> figure that out? Must be some darn good diags suite.
>
> --
> Ciao, Dave

Craig
03-Jul-2007, 02:28 PM
I took my car to the mechanic because it had the "check engine" light on.
After a couple minutes, he said it was all fixed. When I asked him what it
was, he said "I disconnected the check engine light. It won't bother you
any more"

:)


"Jim" <hoo.me@some.net> wrote in message
news:xn0f88al14p5s65000@support-forums.novell.com...
>I reported to Dell that a PC here had "hard drive imminent fail" in the
> Windows event log and that the BIOS SMART said a hard drive parameter
> is out of spec. The solution? They have arranged a service call to
> replace the motherboard. Huh?
> --
>

G of Borg
03-Jul-2007, 04:13 PM
> Aren't IDE controllers on the drive? :)

That'd be SCSI.

Craig
03-Jul-2007, 05:08 PM
http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/ide2.htm

"Most motherboards come with an IDE interface. This interface is often
referred to as an IDE controller, which is incorrect. The interface is
actually a host adapter, meaning that it provides a way to connect a
complete device to the computer (host). The actual controller is on a
circuit board attached to the hard drive. That's the reason it's called
Integrated Drive Electronics in the first place! "

Besides, why would SCSI controllers costs so much then?

:)


"G of Borg" <G@collectiveAB1.com> wrote in message
news:tItii.2306$8i6.1087@prv-forum2.provo.novell.com...
>> Aren't IDE controllers on the drive? :)
>
> That'd be SCSI.

G of Borg
03-Jul-2007, 07:46 PM
> http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/ide2.htm
>
> "Most motherboards come with an IDE interface. This interface is often
> referred to as an IDE controller, which is incorrect. The interface is
> actually a host adapter, meaning that it provides a way to connect a
> complete device to the computer (host). The actual controller is on a
> circuit board attached to the hard drive. That's the reason it's called
> Integrated Drive Electronics in the first place! "

From Wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SCSI

SCSI is based on "SASI", the "Shugart Associates System Interface",
introduced by that company in 1979. The Shugart SASI controller provided an
interface between a hard disk's serial analog interface (called RLL) and a
host computer, which needed to read sectors (blocks) of data. SASI
interface boards were 5¼" x 8" in size, usually mounted on top of a hard
disk drive. SASI was used in mini- and microcomputers like the Apple II.
SASI defined the interface as using a 50-pin flat ribbon connector.

I think depending on the drive and vintage you may find that both types of
drives have at one time or another had a controller on the device. Much
like modems having had their own controlle/DSP which most WinModem's do
not,they offload those functions to the CPU. It had always been in my mind
one of the primary cost savings of IDE over SCSI was the less complicated
logic board on the device itself.

Craig
03-Jul-2007, 08:33 PM
Interesting. I've alway thought of the IDE interface on System boards to be
just that...essentially a dumb interface/connector. Just a bunch of pins,
really. Has there really ever been a "controller" on a motherboard? I've
never heard that.


"G of Borg" <G@collectiveAB1.com> wrote in message
news:sQwii.2420$8i6.526@prv-forum2.provo.novell.com...
>> http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/ide2.htm
>>
>> "Most motherboards come with an IDE interface. This interface is often
>> referred to as an IDE controller, which is incorrect. The interface is
>> actually a host adapter, meaning that it provides a way to connect a
>> complete device to the computer (host). The actual controller is on a
>> circuit board attached to the hard drive. That's the reason it's called
>> Integrated Drive Electronics in the first place! "
>
> From Wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SCSI
>
> SCSI is based on "SASI", the "Shugart Associates System Interface",
> introduced by that company in 1979. The Shugart SASI controller provided
> an
> interface between a hard disk's serial analog interface (called RLL) and a
> host computer, which needed to read sectors (blocks) of data. SASI
> interface boards were 5" x 8" in size, usually mounted on top of a hard
> disk drive. SASI was used in mini- and microcomputers like the Apple II.
> SASI defined the interface as using a 50-pin flat ribbon connector.
>
> I think depending on the drive and vintage you may find that both types of
> drives have at one time or another had a controller on the device. Much
> like modems having had their own controlle/DSP which most WinModem's do
> not,they offload those functions to the CPU. It had always been in my
> mind
> one of the primary cost savings of IDE over SCSI was the less complicated
> logic board on the device itself.

Craig
03-Jul-2007, 08:35 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Advanced_Technology_Attachment

"An early version of the specification, conceived by Western Digital in
1986, was commonly known as Integrated Drive Electronics (IDE) due to the
drive controller being contained on the drive itself as opposed to the
then-common configuration of a separate controller connected to the
computer's motherboard - thus making the interface on the motherboard a host
adapter, though many people continue, by habit, to call it a controller."





"G of Borg" <G@collectiveAB1.com> wrote in message
news:sQwii.2420$8i6.526@prv-forum2.provo.novell.com...
>> http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/ide2.htm
>>
>> "Most motherboards come with an IDE interface. This interface is often
>> referred to as an IDE controller, which is incorrect. The interface is
>> actually a host adapter, meaning that it provides a way to connect a
>> complete device to the computer (host). The actual controller is on a
>> circuit board attached to the hard drive. That's the reason it's called
>> Integrated Drive Electronics in the first place! "
>
> From Wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SCSI
>
> SCSI is based on "SASI", the "Shugart Associates System Interface",
> introduced by that company in 1979. The Shugart SASI controller provided
> an
> interface between a hard disk's serial analog interface (called RLL) and a
> host computer, which needed to read sectors (blocks) of data. SASI
> interface boards were 5" x 8" in size, usually mounted on top of a hard
> disk drive. SASI was used in mini- and microcomputers like the Apple II.
> SASI defined the interface as using a 50-pin flat ribbon connector.
>
> I think depending on the drive and vintage you may find that both types of
> drives have at one time or another had a controller on the device. Much
> like modems having had their own controlle/DSP which most WinModem's do
> not,they offload those functions to the CPU. It had always been in my
> mind
> one of the primary cost savings of IDE over SCSI was the less complicated
> logic board on the device itself.

G of Borg
03-Jul-2007, 08:52 PM
> Interesting. I've alway thought of the IDE interface on System boards to
> be just that...essentially a dumb interface/connector. Just a bunch of >
pins,
> really. Has there really ever been a "controller" on a motherboard? I've
> never heard that.

Well they do sell independent IDE controllers. If you go back a few years
<clears throat> you could buy IDE controllers in a variety of types. There
were ATA 100 controllers that were sold as aftermarket parts for
motherboards that did not support ATA 100/133. So you could replace your
ATA/33/66 spec onboard controller. There were/are still aftermarket IDE
RAID controllers. Motherboards with on-board RAID have IDE RAID
controllers on board. The most typical IDE controllers are based on
Winbond chipsets although there are undoubtedly many vendors. The bottom
line is yes motherboards typically have onboard IDE controllers (unless
they are vintage) though they are typically very basic I/O devices unless
you have a premium motherboard with IDE-RAID built in.

G of Borg
03-Jul-2007, 09:00 PM
> "An early version of the specification, conceived by Western Digital in
> 1986, was commonly known as Integrated Drive Electronics (IDE) due to the
> drive controller being contained on the drive itself as opposed to the
> then-common configuration of a separate controller connected to the
> computer's motherboard - thus making the interface on the motherboard a
> host adapter, though many people continue, by habit, to call it a
> controller."

Yes that is another way of saying what your other post said.
I usually see 'HBA' and 'controller' used interchangeably, so it could be
one of those technical semantic arguments. I'm certainly not going to argue
the point at that level since it is beyond my understanding. If you really
want to get to the meat of it and technical nauseum I'd suggest looking up
the topic on Anandtech. http://anandtech.com/

Craig
03-Jul-2007, 11:17 PM
Naaa....just a curiosity. I am thinking "conventional" story is
SCSI=Controller on card, IDE=Controller on drive. Due to verbal misuse, the
two became one.

And yeah, I remember when system boards didn't have IDE controllers (I mean,
interfaces!)as a matter of course. :)


"G of Borg" <G@collectiveAB1.com> wrote in message
news:EVxii.2482$8i6.1588@prv-forum2.provo.novell.com...
>> "An early version of the specification, conceived by Western Digital in
>> 1986, was commonly known as Integrated Drive Electronics (IDE) due to the
>> drive controller being contained on the drive itself as opposed to the
>> then-common configuration of a separate controller connected to the
>> computer's motherboard - thus making the interface on the motherboard a
>> host adapter, though many people continue, by habit, to call it a
>> controller."
>
> Yes that is another way of saying what your other post said.
> I usually see 'HBA' and 'controller' used interchangeably, so it could be
> one of those technical semantic arguments. I'm certainly not going to
> argue
> the point at that level since it is beyond my understanding. If you
> really
> want to get to the meat of it and technical nauseum I'd suggest looking up
> the topic on Anandtech. http://anandtech.com/

Sewermonger
04-Jul-2007, 12:36 AM
HAL: [after one of those pauses which must seem an eternity to a
computer] "Of course I am ... Just a moment ... just a moment ... I've
just picked up a fault in the AE35 unit. It's going to go a hundred
percent failure within seventy-two hours."

[insert spacewalk]

Bowman: "Well, HAL, I'm darned if I can find anything wrong with it."


HAL: "Yes, it's puzzling. I don't think I've ever seen anything quite
like this before. I would recommend that we put the unit back in
operation, and let it fail ... we can certainly afford to be out of
communication for the short time it will take to replace it."



--
Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana.

Wallgames.com
04-Jul-2007, 01:56 AM
No one ever said it was IDE.

-Bob Carroll


"Craig" <tech@no-spam.novoco.com> wrote in message
news:hWzii.2564$8i6.2379@prv-forum2.provo.novell.com...
> Naaa....just a curiosity. I am thinking "conventional" story is
> SCSI=Controller on card, IDE=Controller on drive. Due to verbal misuse,
> the two became one.
>
> And yeah, I remember when system boards didn't have IDE controllers (I
> mean, interfaces!)as a matter of course. :)
>
>
> "G of Borg" <G@collectiveAB1.com> wrote in message
> news:EVxii.2482$8i6.1588@prv-forum2.provo.novell.com...
>>> "An early version of the specification, conceived by Western Digital in
>>> 1986, was commonly known as Integrated Drive Electronics (IDE) due to
>>> the
>>> drive controller being contained on the drive itself as opposed to the
>>> then-common configuration of a separate controller connected to the
>>> computer's motherboard - thus making the interface on the motherboard a
>>> host adapter, though many people continue, by habit, to call it a
>>> controller."
>>
>> Yes that is another way of saying what your other post said.
>> I usually see 'HBA' and 'controller' used interchangeably, so it could be
>> one of those technical semantic arguments. I'm certainly not going to
>> argue
>> the point at that level since it is beyond my understanding. If you
>> really
>> want to get to the meat of it and technical nauseum I'd suggest looking
>> up
>> the topic on Anandtech. http://anandtech.com/
>
>

Craig
04-Jul-2007, 02:16 AM
You're (kinda) right. Dave Taylor did though...that's who I was replying
to. HOWEVER, it did wind up seeming that the OP mentioned IDE, when in fact
he did not!


"Wallgames.com" <BobNOSPAMPLEASE@wallgames.com> wrote in message
news:YeCii.2605$8i6.1752@prv-forum2.provo.novell.com...
> No one ever said it was IDE.
>
> -Bob Carroll
>
>
> "Craig" <tech@no-spam.novoco.com> wrote in message
> news:hWzii.2564$8i6.2379@prv-forum2.provo.novell.com...
>> Naaa....just a curiosity. I am thinking "conventional" story is
>> SCSI=Controller on card, IDE=Controller on drive. Due to verbal misuse,
>> the two became one.
>>
>> And yeah, I remember when system boards didn't have IDE controllers (I
>> mean, interfaces!)as a matter of course. :)
>>
>>
>> "G of Borg" <G@collectiveAB1.com> wrote in message
>> news:EVxii.2482$8i6.1588@prv-forum2.provo.novell.com...
>>>> "An early version of the specification, conceived by Western Digital in
>>>> 1986, was commonly known as Integrated Drive Electronics (IDE) due to
>>>> the
>>>> drive controller being contained on the drive itself as opposed to the
>>>> then-common configuration of a separate controller connected to the
>>>> computer's motherboard - thus making the interface on the motherboard a
>>>> host adapter, though many people continue, by habit, to call it a
>>>> controller."
>>>
>>> Yes that is another way of saying what your other post said.
>>> I usually see 'HBA' and 'controller' used interchangeably, so it could
>>> be
>>> one of those technical semantic arguments. I'm certainly not going to
>>> argue
>>> the point at that level since it is beyond my understanding. If you
>>> really
>>> want to get to the meat of it and technical nauseum I'd suggest looking
>>> up
>>> the topic on Anandtech. http://anandtech.com/
>>
>>
>
>

Dave Taylor
05-Jul-2007, 12:45 PM
"Craig" <tech@no-spam.novoco.com> wrote in
news:8yCii.2608$8i6.522@prv-forum2.provo.novell.com:

> You're (kinda) right. Dave Taylor did though...that's who I was
> replying to. HOWEVER, it did wind up seeming that the OP mentioned
> IDE, when in fact he did not!

LOL, I sure stirred up a nest here...

--
Ciao, Dave

Jim
05-Jul-2007, 04:19 PM
OP here...it's an SATA drive ;)
--



Dave Taylor wrote:

> "Craig" <tech@no-spam.novoco.com> wrote in
> news:8yCii.2608$8i6.522@prv-forum2.provo.novell.com:
>
> > You're (kinda) right. Dave Taylor did though...that's who I was
> > replying to. HOWEVER, it did wind up seeming that the OP mentioned
> > IDE, when in fact he did not!
>
> LOL, I sure stirred up a nest here...

Jim
05-Jul-2007, 04:20 PM
LOL Dell guy showed up unannounced, handed me a new hard drive and a
return box, then left.
--



Jim wrote:

> I reported to Dell that a PC here had "hard drive imminent fail" in
> the Windows event log and that the BIOS SMART said a hard drive
> parameter is out of spec. The solution? They have arranged a service
> call to replace the motherboard. Huh?

G of Borg
05-Jul-2007, 05:29 PM
> LOL, I sure stirred up a nest here...

Nah it was just a discourse in understanding.
I'm still not sure we have a definitive answer. :)
A lot of PC architecture at one time or another
is experimental...take a look at RAMBUS...or those
iTanium things. :)

Craig
05-Jul-2007, 06:01 PM
or VLB!
"G of Borg" <G@collectiveAB1.com> wrote in message
news:l%8ji.3153$8i6.1771@prv-forum2.provo.novell.com...
>> LOL, I sure stirred up a nest here...
>
> Nah it was just a discourse in understanding.
> I'm still not sure we have a definitive answer. :)
> A lot of PC architecture at one time or another
> is experimental...take a look at RAMBUS...or those
> iTanium things. :)
>
>

tdstr
05-Jul-2007, 06:13 PM
Craig wrote:
> or VLB!
> "G of Borg" <G@collectiveAB1.com> wrote in message
> news:l%8ji.3153$8i6.1771@prv-forum2.provo.novell.com...
>>> LOL, I sure stirred up a nest here...
>> Nah it was just a discourse in understanding.
>> I'm still not sure we have a definitive answer. :)
>> A lot of PC architecture at one time or another
>> is experimental...take a look at RAMBUS...or those
>> iTanium things. :)
>>
>>
>
>

Then there's Micro Channel :)

Ted Novak
TRA#5512
IEAS#75

Craig
05-Jul-2007, 06:39 PM
Some were better than others..............
"tdstr" <tdstr@foadspammer.com> wrote in message
news:JE9ji.3182$8i6.546@prv-forum2.provo.novell.com...
> Craig wrote:
>> or VLB!
>> "G of Borg" <G@collectiveAB1.com> wrote in message
>> news:l%8ji.3153$8i6.1771@prv-forum2.provo.novell.com...
>>>> LOL, I sure stirred up a nest here...
>>> Nah it was just a discourse in understanding.
>>> I'm still not sure we have a definitive answer. :)
>>> A lot of PC architecture at one time or another
>>> is experimental...take a look at RAMBUS...or those
>>> iTanium things. :)
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>
> Then there's Micro Channel :)
>
> Ted Novak
> TRA#5512
> IEAS#75

Craig
05-Jul-2007, 07:24 PM
but did it fix it? :)
"Jim" <hoo.me@some.net> wrote in message
news:xn0f8c71i8k7kah001@support-forums.novell.com...
> LOL Dell guy showed up unannounced, handed me a new hard drive and a
> return box, then left.
> --
>
>
>
> Jim wrote:
>
>> I reported to Dell that a PC here had "hard drive imminent fail" in
>> the Windows event log and that the BIOS SMART said a hard drive
>> parameter is out of spec. The solution? They have arranged a service
>> call to replace the motherboard. Huh?

G of Borg
05-Jul-2007, 09:46 PM
Speaking of VLB...I have an IDE RAID 'controller' using that. :)

tdstr
05-Jul-2007, 09:55 PM
G of Borg wrote:
> Speaking of VLB...I have an IDE RAID 'controller' using that. :)
>
>


Lemme guess....Promise Tech?

Ted Novak
TRA#5512
IEAS#75

G of Borg
05-Jul-2007, 11:38 PM
>
> Lemme guess....Promise Tech?

Tekram

G of Borg
05-Jul-2007, 11:40 PM
http://www.solorb.com/gsale/DSCN2722.JPG

Jim
06-Jul-2007, 04:13 PM
Well the old drive definitely failed "reallocated sectors" under SMART
and the PC is back to its old self for now.

Until a couple of years ago I'd never had a hard drive fail around
here, now I've had four in the last year. Standards must be slipping...
--

Craig wrote:

> but did it fix it? :)
> "Jim" <hoo.me@some.net> wrote in message
> news:xn0f8c71i8k7kah001@support-forums.novell.com...
> > LOL Dell guy showed up unannounced, handed me a new hard drive and a
> > return box, then left.
> > --
> >
> >
> > Jim wrote:
> >
> > > I reported to Dell that a PC here had "hard drive imminent fail"
> > > in the Windows event log and that the BIOS SMART said a hard drive
> > > parameter is out of spec. The solution? They have arranged a
> > > service call to replace the motherboard. Huh?

Craig
07-Jul-2007, 12:54 AM
But is it a "caching" controller?
"G of Borg" <G@collectiveAB1.com> wrote in message
news:wMcji.3261$8i6.2967@prv-forum2.provo.novell.com...
> Speaking of VLB...I have an IDE RAID 'controller' using that. :)
>
>

Dave Taylor
08-Jul-2007, 08:50 AM
"Jim" <hoo.me@some.net> wrote in news:xn0f8dlfl9ze6hu000@support-
forums.novell.com:

> Until a couple of years ago I'd never had a hard drive fail around
> here, now I've had four in the last year. Standards must be slipping...

Brands changed? I personally think it is because the drives are pushed so
hard at the head/platter level now to get density. And there is the
tolerances issue too. So my gut tells me we are using drives that at the
absolute limit, red lined as it were, and this is why they are failing.
At least now we are seeing some cool new stuff like hybrid with flash ram
and drives made for extreme environments. Copiers use hard drives, copiers
also vibrate. I try to use flash ram when I can, but most of the time it
is more cost effective to use a HDD. What I want is a very fast, very
cheap, 40 gig Flash drive with a 2.5 inch form factor and IDE interface.


--
Ciao, Dave

Dave Taylor
08-Jul-2007, 08:53 AM
G of Borg <G@collectiveAB1.com> wrote in news:nreji.3304$8i6.915@prv-
forum2.provo.novell.com:

> http://www.solorb.com/gsale/DSCN2722.JPG
>

That was so high tech with a 386. I think I got my VLB box upgraded with
an Overdrive processor replacement. I tried to over clock that system too,
but it was unstable overclocked.

--
Ciao, Dave

Dave Taylor
08-Jul-2007, 08:54 AM
"Craig" <tech@no-spam.novoco.com> wrote in news:wCAji.3812$8i6.2054@prv-
forum2.provo.novell.com:

> But is it a "caching" controller?

Yes, because it has ram on it.

--
Ciao, Dave

G of Borg
16-Jul-2007, 08:12 PM
> That was so high tech with a 386. I think I got my VLB box upgraded with
> an Overdrive processor replacement. I tried to over clock that system
> too, but it was unstable overclocked.

Hah. Sounds like we had the same setup except mine was a 486
with overdrive chip.:)

Dave Taylor
17-Jul-2007, 11:19 AM
G of Borg <G@collectiveAB1.com> wrote in news:jqPmi.2209$QE3.2132@prv-
forum2.provo.novell.com:

> Hah. Sounds like we had the same setup except mine was a 486
> with overdrive chip.:)

Now that you mention it... I think the overdrive did go into the
"second" box.
Anyways, I distinctly remember some choice moments in no particular
order...
Spinrite v3 on an mfm drive!
300 baud modem uninstalled 1200 in
the 10 gig drive dying and no recent backup
fractint running for 3 days and someone forgetting to save the progress
moving to NCSA mosaic from lynx
Netscape from mosaic
custom mime types to get .avi and .mpg to work in early browsers like
ncsa mosaic and netscape 0.7 ( it came to my house on a 1.4 meg floppy)
winG in 3.11
custom modem AT sets to make them go faster and stop drops when someone
picked up the extension. Oh yeah, disable auto retrain down really
helped too.

Back when you needed to know how stuff worked or it would not go. Pre
PNP motherboards are the best learning tool for hardware IMHO. That
said, no one has any anymore and they are not in the curriculum. I guess
they don't really need to be if pnp works.




--
Ciao, Dave

G of Borg
17-Jul-2007, 04:39 PM
But you didn't even mention setting up Winsock and TCP/IP. :)

Dave Taylor
18-Jul-2007, 11:15 AM
G of Borg <G@collectiveAB1.com> wrote in news:yo5ni.2890$QE3.2465@prv-
forum2.provo.novell.com:

> But you didn't even mention setting up Winsock and TCP/IP. :)

Yeah, but I thought of it 8)
Good old Trumpet and zterm, RIP.

--
Ciao, Dave