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Thread: OES, SLES9 & 64-bit

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  1. #1
    Owen Zorge NNTP User

    OES, SLES9 & 64-bit

    Ok. I have been reading the posts and I have come to these conclusions:

    1. OES is not supported on the 64-bit version of SLES 9 running on Intel EM64T.

    2. As an MLA customer with OES (NW6.5) service & support, I don't have a license to the 64-bit version of SLES 9. I must purchase it separately in order to use it whether I'm wanting to run OES on it or not (although I can't, yet).

    Am I correct so far?

    So my questions are these... can you run legacy 32-bit applications on a 64-bit kernel of SLES9? Has anyone tried installing any of the OES sw on a 64-bit SLES box? I know you can run a 32-bit version of SLES on a 64-bit server with the RAM limitation.

    When does Novell plan to have the 64-bit version of OES shipping? Beta? Hopefully they will make it easy to upgrade to OES 64-bit from SLES9 64-bit.

    Is there any documentation or compatibility matrices on Novell's website that describes all these relationships (OES, SLES9, 32-Bit, 64-Bit, compatibility).

    Thanks,
    OZ

    Owen Zorge
    IT Specialist III
    AZ Department of Emergency and Military Affairs
    602-392-7507
    owen.zorge@azdema.gov


  2. #2
    J.H.M. Dassen (Ray) NNTP User

    Re: OES, SLES9 & 64-bit

    Owen Zorge <Owen.Zorge-remove@this-azdema.gov> wrote:
    > Ok. I have been reading the posts and I have come to these conclusions:
    >
    > 1. OES is not supported on the 64-bit version of SLES 9 running on Intel =
    > EM64T.
    >
    > 2. As an MLA customer with OES (NW6.5) service & support, I don't have a =
    > license to the 64-bit version of SLES 9. I must purchase it separately in =
    > order to use it whether I'm wanting to run OES on it or not (although I =
    > can't, yet).
    >
    > Am I correct so far?


    AFAICT, yes.

    > So my questions are these... can you run legacy 32-bit applications on a =
    > 64-bit kernel of SLES9?


    In general, you can run x86 binaries on x86-64. That doesn't mean they will
    always behave the way you would expect (or like) them to behave and as such,
    I would not recommend using this feature if you can avoid it. In particular,
    I would recommend against trying to use the 32-bit compatibility for
    criticial services.

    HTH,
    --
    Ray Dassen
    Technical Support Engineer, EMEA Services Center
    Novell Technical Services http://support.novell.com/

  3. #3
    Sandy NNTP User

    Re: OES, SLES9 & 64-bit

    J.H.M. Dassen (Ray) wrote on 2005-07-21 00:12:
    > Owen Zorge <Owen.Zorge-remove@this-azdema.gov> wrote:
    >
    >>Ok. I have been reading the posts and I have come to these conclusions:
    >>
    >>1. OES is not supported on the 64-bit version of SLES 9 running on Intel =
    >>EM64T.
    >>
    >>2. As an MLA customer with OES (NW6.5) service & support, I don't have a =
    >>license to the 64-bit version of SLES 9. I must purchase it separately in =
    >>order to use it whether I'm wanting to run OES on it or not (although I =
    >>can't, yet).
    >>
    >>Am I correct so far?

    >
    >
    > AFAICT, yes.
    >
    >
    >>So my questions are these... can you run legacy 32-bit applications on a =
    >>64-bit kernel of SLES9?

    >
    >
    > In general, you can run x86 binaries on x86-64. That doesn't mean they will
    > always behave the way you would expect (or like) them to behave and as such,
    > I would not recommend using this feature if you can avoid it. In particular,
    > I would recommend against trying to use the 32-bit compatibility for
    > criticial services.


    IIRC the problem is that the x86-64 processor has to be switched between 32 and 64 bit
    modes every time the scheduler switches between 32 and 64 bit threads. As you can imagine
    this can be somewhat inefficient.

    The biggest limitation is that you can't use 32-bit kernel extensions/modules such as
    device drivers on a 64-bit OS.
    If I understand this correctly, this is because of the way the x86 architecture uses
    interrupt requests (IRQs) - a device often triggers an interrupt - which interrupts
    everything (including the scheduler itself), demanding to be processed immediately.

    To work around this limitation/inefficiency of the x86 architecture, often now days the
    device driver will acknowledge an interrupt and then schedule for later the processing of
    that interrupt, but since the driver has to do that, and that has to happen before
    anything else can, the scheduler can't make the 32/64 switch to allow the driver to run,
    so everything would hang.

    This is why the 32-bit Novell Client for Windows can't be used on Windows x64, and why you
    can't just install & run OES on the 64-bit version of SLES 9 (there are drivers in OES).

    Please correct me if I've made a mistake here.

    -Sandy

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